Tag Archive for Dillon Gee

The Ex Files, 2016

Andrew Beaton’s welcome-home profile of new Mets second baseman Neil Walker includes this fascinating detail: Walker, it turns out, has taken over the Upper East Side apartment lease of Jon Niese, the man he was traded for over the winter.

18And no, Jon Niese didn’t move into Walker’s parent’s home in Pittsburgh, but he did turn up wearing Walker’s former uniform number, 18, in Pittsburgh, making the trade a Reverse Uni Swap. Niese you may have seen, started the other day for the Pirates and was positively Niese-like: 5 innings, 4 earned runs, 7 whiffs, and a no-decision.

Here’s a look at a few other ex-2015 Mets and their new numerical identities:

Daniel Murphy is wearing No. 20 in Washington, where fans say #TheyreWith28 when it comes to outfielder Jayson Werth.

In Milwaukee, Kirk Nieuwenhuis has suited up in No. 10 and Carlos Torres in 59, changes from their respective 9 and 52/72 here. Kirk beat out former teammate Eric Young Jr. for the reserve outfield slot with the Brewers.

Departed heroes of 2015’s famous bench-strength acquisition: Atlanta Brave Kelly Johnson wears No. 24, while Juan Uribe is wearing No. 4 and a skicap with the Indians.

We unfortunately didn’t get deep enough into Kansas City’s bullpen earlier this week to see Dillon Gee, who reverses his customary 35 with the World Champs, wearing 53.

Phinally in Phoenix, irritating short reliever Tyler Clippard wears No. 19. He was 46 last time around in New York.

Scattered rubble of the National League champs including Scott Rice (Arizona), Eric O’Flaherty (Pittsburgh), Wilfredo Tovar (Minnesota), Jack Leathersich (Chicago Cubs), Alex Torres (Atlanta), Anthony Recker (Cleveland), Darrell Ceciliani (Toronto) and Bobby Parnell (Detroit) didn’t crack opening-day rosters.

Welcome home Mets!

 

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Standing O

44Newly arriving reliever Eric O’Flaherty is reportedly suiting up in No. 44 and as my pal Greg says, let’s hope he’s tougher on lefties than his predecessor in that jersey, the late John Mayberry Jr.

To make room for Flaherty, who was acquired last night for a Player To Be Named Later, the Mets designated Alex Torres and his gigantic hat for assignment, a move freeing up No. 54 for the next guy who wants it.

35In the meantime, keep your eye on the Mets’ starting rotation, which is expected at this time to slot in a 6th starter next time around. Speculation in the radio booth last night said it could be minor league teammates Dillon Gee and Logan Verrett competing for that — and next issue of No. 35. I’d guess at this point that Gee has the inside the inside track to the start, while Verrett, as a member of the 40-man roister, has a rightful claim on 35. But still it would weird to see Gee wearing 54. Baseball’s a funny game.

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Observing A Lot Just By Watching

70So I was away in Europe the last week of the season and so completely missed the surprise re-emergence of good old No. 70, Wilfredo Tovar. I also missed the decisive sweep of the Braves that helped us to not only spoil whatever playoff hopes they had left to but catch them in the standings, and Lucas Duda’s heroic capture of the 30-home run mark, and Bobby Abreu’s feel-good retirement, and Sandy Alderson’s new contract. On the positive side, I missed all the incessant Jeter hype.

I further forgot to investigate the suggestion below that at least while David Wright remained active the Mets were running Nos. 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 out there on a regular basis, maybe for the first time ever. I didn’t note that the best career ERA ever recorded by a No. 48 now belongs to Jacob deGrom, a deserving Rookie of the Year candidate.

I guess the message of this season might be, It Wasn’t All Bad If You Were Actually Paying Attention. Sure the next step will require a club that makes a lot fewer execution errors than this one did, while scoring a bunch more runs, but its not unrealistic to expect a few good decisions this winter and the continued evolution of the emerging core could accomplish that.

28Nobody asked me, but my guess is that we’ve seen the last of both Dillon Gee and Daniel Murphy. Gee, who had a poor year and a lengthy injury this season, probably doesn’t have enough talent to fit into the staff next season. Everyone loves Murphy, but given his rising price and the fact that we’ve got some Flores and then Herrera waiting, it only makes sense to move on. Perhaps he goes in that big trade for that  outfielder and/or shortstop and/or leadoff hitter this club needs. Stay tuned.

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Gee, Too Bad

35By now you probably know all about Dillon Gee’s blood-clot surgery and the probability he won’t be back for awhile. While off-days and the lengthy All-Star Break assure we wouldn’t necessarily need a fifth starter for another week or so already there’s much speculation this means the impending promotion of Matt Harvey or even Zack Wheeler amid fears that instead it’ll be Miguel Batista or Jeremy Hefner. And no matter what, it slathers an extra helping of intrigue over the possibility the Mets make a trade in the coming weeks: the deadline is less than 3 weeks away.

In the immediate future there’s a the matter of what number Josh Edgin will wear. You might recall this beefy lefthanded relief prospect from Spring Training, when a surprisingly strong performance had him elevated from the longshotty No. 87 to the respectable No. 54 before a late cut relegated him to the minors. The issue since then is that bullpen catcher Dave Racianello has been wearing 54 (despite what its says on the Mets official roster), so it looks as though Edgin will need another number: 20, 22, 32, 38, and 64 are still available.

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Zippity Duda, Gee Whiz

OK, back from little visit to the beach and have a ton of useless info to catch up on. As detailed in the comments section below, the Mets have recalled a bunch of players from the minors and are suddenly flirting with the prospect of debuting the 900th player in team history, an unthinkable mark only a few months ago. So as to keep this update nice and organized, let’s proceed directly to the sacred scrolls:


12892: 
Joaquin Arias. Acquired for hapless hacker Jeff Francoeur in a waiver deal with the Texas Rangers, Arias was once chosen ahead of Robinson Cano by the Rangers for payment in the Alex Rodriguez deal. He’s a utility infielder who was designated for assignment when Texas acquired Alex Cora, if you want to get an idea of how he was thought of around Dallas. The Mets assigned him the same No. 12 worn by Francoeur, making this a DUD (Del Unser Deal) and final slap in the face to Francoeur who ought to be remembered as Bobby Cox’s final Masterstroke in a long career of screwing over the Mets. If anyone knew Francoeur possessed just enough talent to intrigue Omar Minaya and just enough personal magnetism and discount price to excite the owners, it was him. Jeff lived up to every expectation.
893: Lucas Duda. The outfielder had a terrific season at Buffalo but a rough start at the plate for the Mets. They assigned him No. 21: Most recently on the back of recently departed catch Rod Barajas.

894: Mike Nickeas. He’s the catcher the Mets collected in another right fielder dump to Texas a few years ago — the Victor Diaz deal. Nickeas makes an intriguing addition in that he dates all the way back to Tim Bogar in the oldest active Trade Chain among Mets: He was acquired for Diaz, who was acquired for Jeromy Burnitz in 2003, who came from Milwaukee in that whacky Todd Zeile thingy also involving Lenny Harris, who was acquired for Bill Pulsipher, who was (re-)acuired for Luis Lopez, who initially came over for Bogar, a 1987 Met draftee. Nickeas wears No. 13, the first since Cora.

895: Dillon Gee. Mets.com has him wearing No. 35, last worn by opening-day cleanup hitter and future trivia answer Mike Jacobs this year. Frequently described as one of those minor league prospects with limited repetoire but who “knows how to compete,” (gulp) Gee gets Tuesday’s start at Washington.

In the meantime the Mets also welcomed back outfielder and serial No. 6 acquirer Nick Evans; relievers Raul ValdesNo. 22; and Sean GreenNo. 50; as well as reliever-turned-starter Jenrry MejiaNo. 32. Outfielder Jesus Feliciano is also back in No. 27.

Other than the bad baseball, did I miss anything?

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