The Matlack Mets Murder Mystery of 1970

Jon Matlack, the nasty lefty whose stuff was way more effective than his record ever reflected, is finally getting the recognition he deserves.

Matlack, from SABR: https://sabr.org/bioproj/person/c0ddd500

The Mets announced earlier this year that Matlack was among three deserving new enrollees in the club’s oft-neglected Hall of Fame: Edgardo Alfonzo and Ron Darling are the other two.

The starting rotation onto which Matlack earned his way in 1972 wasn’t an easy one to crack. The 17-year-old first-round draft pick out of West Chester, Pa. in 1967 (4th in the country that year) had the mixed blessing of coming around at a time when slightly older contemporaries like Seaver, Koosman, Gentry and Ryan were just establishing themselves as big-league youngsters with the Mets and so he spent nearly three full seasons at AAA waiting his turn.

Interestingly Matlack got a look with the September callups of 1970, but never appeared in a game. What number did he wear then? Well, that depends on where you looked–and when.

The Daily News announced his arrival on September 3 that year and indicated that Matlack had been assigned No. 27.

As often accompanies these mysteries the Mets were on the road at the time in St. Louis and en route to Chicago, where sure enough Matlack appeared on a scorecard roster from that series in Wrigley– only this time listed as No. 50:

Back in New York, a scorecard accompanying the Sept. 10 game at Shea lists Matlack wearing neither 27 nor 50, but 35. We’ve has this record for some time and consider it the unoffical official record: Matlack was in uniform and active but simply didn’t appear.

Interestingly if you read the Daily News clip above–one hell of a notes column with Cool Papa Bell making an appearance–you’ll also get the whisper that GM Bob Scheffing was in the process of shopping for an unnamed veteran pitcher who needed to clear waivers. This is because the defending world champs were in a dogfight for a division crown at the time with Pittsburgh and Chicago. The Mets reportedly were seeking Yankees’ veteran lefty Steve Hamilton but they were blocked when the White Sox made a deal for him. Instead they scooped up Dean Chance from Cleveland.

This is notable for our tale because Chance was assigned No. 27. He also played a crucial role in the Mets’ ultimate shortcoming in that pennant race. Chance’s first Mets’ appearance came in the 10th inning of game 2 of a doubleheader with division-leading Pittsburgh on Sept. 20. The Mets won Game 1, but Dean blew his Chance, so to speak. Called on to relieve Tug McGraw with a runner on second, one out and 1 run in giving the Pirates a 6-5 lead, Chance intentionally walked Dave Cash, gave up a 2-run triple to light-hitting Gene Alley, then a squeeze bunt from Dave Guisti. The 4-run rally was more than enough and the Mets never got closer in the race.

Matlack, presumably wearing No. 35, watched it all from the bullpen and wouldn’t participate in meaningful Mets baseball until a star turn in the 1973 playoffs. In spring training of 1971, Matlack was again wearing No. 35:

But by the time he got a call to the Mets in July, 35 was on the back of teammate Charlie Williams and so Matlack was issued No. 32, with which he made his big-league debut and would wear to a Rookie-of-the-Year performance in 1972, the aforementioned dominance in the 1973 postseason, and All-Star appearances in 1974, 1975 and 1976, before the diminishing Mets traded him to Texas following a disappointing performance in 1977. Matlack spent six seasons in Texas including an excellent 1978 (15-13, 2.27, 270 innings and 18 complete games), and later went on to star in the Senior League in 1990, and coach for several organizations.

Forty-three years later, Matlack is coming back to where he belongs.

 

 

 

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The Name of the Game

As disappointed as we all are to learn the start of the baseball season has been delayed as part of the economic wreckage of incompetent U.S. preparedness for the coronavirus, perhaps there’s a silver lining in not immediately experiencing how dumb it’s going to be when new rules requiring relief pitchers throw to at least three batters takes effect. And the March 26 opening date seemed obscenely early anyway. I don’t often bother to show up in Flushing until May, given that place is guaranteed to be 20 degrees colder and twice as damp as anywhere else in the five boroughs, but let’s hope they get it going by then.

How are we going to pass the time though? I’d been suffering through the Islanders season and now that’s done too. So we’re rewatching The Wire on the stream, and reading some books.

Around here we care primarily about the number on the back of the jersey but much of what needs to be said about the letters above them is addressed with wit, insight and just the right mix of respect and humor in HALL OF NAME, a new book coming out any day now from D.B. Firstman.

I’ve known D.B. primarily through SABR and the Twitterverse for some time now, and they were gracious to offer an early copy, which I’d been eating piecemeal for a few weeks.

That’s in fact one of the cool things about this book: You can open it to any of its 312 pages and find something fun and interesting. The book includes short biographies, trivial facts, anagrams and vague sound-alikes for 100 of baseball’s “most magnificent monikers” from Boof Bonzer to Coco Crisp to Joe Zdeb.

Even more precisely than numbers, D.B. notes, names lend a uniqueness to the game’s characters that’s part of the fun; but what I enjoyed the most was the revelation of a little bit more than just the stats accompanying those names that would make you briefly pause and admire while thumbing through the Baseball Encyclopedia (Rivington Bisland, Jennings Poindexter, Orval Overall); uncommon commons revealed in a pack of Topps cards (Mark Lemongello, Greg Legg, Biff Pocoroba); or references that never fail to elicit a giggle (Johnny Dickshot, Rusty Kuntz, and Pete LaCock, the latter all lovingly written up in a section helpfully called DIRTY NAMES DONE DIRT CHEAP).

There’s a little Met content too, with J.J. Putz, Lastings Milledge, Angel Pagan, Razor Shines, Ambiorix Burgos and Xavier Nady among those featured.

You’re stuck at home with no baseball? Go out and get a copy or have your bookstore deliver one, like I said it’ll be out any day now. And in honor of the book’s publishing, here’s my list of the Mets All-Time Name Team. They may not win much, but you’ll never forget them:

1B: Marv Throneberry

2B: Chin-lung Hu

3B: Pumpsie Green

SS: Adeiny Hechavaria

OF: Darryl Strawberry, Don Hahn, Prentice Redman

C: Greg Goosen, Taylor Teagarden

P: Wally Whitehurst, Ken MacKenzie, Vinegar Bend Mizell, Patrick Strange, Bartolome Fortunato, Roadblock Jones, Al Schmelz

How are you going to make it through? Who makes your all-name club?

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Born in the 50s

The following essay was submitted by longtime reader Edward Hoyt. If you’d like to contribute your own takes on Met uni matters, and especially if it’s up to the level of excellence displayed here, feel free to pitch me at mbtn01 (at) yahoo dot-com.

There’s always an interesting lede when a player returns as a coach to a team he made a mark with as a player. If he was a particularly good player, his homecoming is celebrated with some level of excitement. If he had previously passed through without distinction, it can still be a feel-good story with a potential for redemption.

But after that first day’s story, there’s frequently a minor tragedy — visible on a daily basis — when that player gets his uniform, and it underscores that that whatever value a man might represent as a coach, he is still just a coach. The players get the low numbers and coaches get a number in the fifties … or worse. Leftover numbers.

With most coaches, we shrug. This is their lot in life. But with the coach who had previously played for the team, what heart isn’t touched by the cruel marginalization of seeing Mookie Wilson’s 1 become 51, of seeing Bud Harrelson’s 3 displaced by 53, and Howard Johnson’s familiar 20 being twisted and distorted into a 52 (wtf?)? These fleet youthful birds of yesteryear return to us with the anonymous digits of backup linebackers and special teams long snappers — easy-to-release taxi-squad regulars.

So it is with a ray of spring sunshine that we today see a youthful Jeremy Hefner return as pitching coach (nearly an effing half century younger than his predecessor) in the same 53 he brandished as a player. He had the small grace to come to the team under circumstances no more dramatic than the hiring of a coach (a minor league contract in January 2014), got a number that reflected that, and briefly flourished in it. But when his status upgraded itself to rotation mainstay for about a full season split between 2012 and 2013, his number stayed the same. So his return as a coach in such high digits is not a dim a signal that he can tack on a few more paychecks by cashing in on a large legacy, but that he’s here to add some more substance to a small one — the same guy in the same uniform with the same number on a somewhat different road.

When last heard from in a Mets spring training camp back in 2014, Hef was a bit player in one of those stupid Matt Harvey dustups that always seemed perfectly timed for a day when there was no other news. The team was settling into their spring digs and Harv decided to complain that rehabbing players were not dressing next to the active players training and preparing for games. Now, there are certainly sound arguments for and against keeping everybody integrated even if they’re on a different springtime agenda, but rather than make an internal appeal, Harv decided to take his case to the media. And to make it clear this snit wasn’t about him, he decided to drag poor Hefner into the argument. The Mets are marginalizing me and Hef, the two Tommy John rehabilitation cases, Harvey complained.

Hefner, suitably, seemed embarrassed to be dragged into the story, presumably happy to still be receiving a big league salary that was now existentially threatened — his status even more tenuous than the number 53 implied. And when that status exploded alongside a second UCL tear before his rehab was done, ending his career, the story was about whether the fall of Harvey’s rehab partner would serve as an object lesson for him.

It was always about Harvey.

But now, released from the Angels and finding no suitors this offseason, it is The Dark Knight facing the doorway of oblivion, non-roster infielder Max Moroff getting little attention in Harvey’s old 33, and Jeremy Hefner returning to his 53, ready to build on a legacy that is now all his own. While other players returning as coaches have their light dimmed by a number assignment in the 50s, Hef is shining all the brighter.

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More Spring Data

Last week we published the Mets all-time record in Spring games. This week, our special guest data scientist has provided a detailed breakdown of that record including some stuff that the team’s “official” record, as published in its annual media guide, has overlooked.

Kind of interesting, but the Mets have never played the Cactus-Leaguing spring clubs of the Brewers, Rockies, Diamondbacks or Padres. Here’s the data (click to embiggen):

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Mets Spring Training Historical Record

MBTN’s readers are the best readers. One of them, who chooses to remain anonymous, has painstakingly assembled and graciously shared the following staggering bit of overlooked team history, which we will present in two parts. Today, here’s a look at the club’s year-by-year spring training record. Now, few of us put real stock in spring records but it’s not like meaningless and overlooked details have stopped us before.

Excluding ties, the Spring Mets are just a tiny bit better than their regular-season counterparts with a .487 winning percentage to the club’s .481. And hat’s off to the 1988 club, whose performance in Florida set the spring standard. We’ll share more detailed data on spring records soon.

Year W L T PCT. XT-PCT.
1962 12 15 0 .444 .444
1963 15 12 0 .556 .556
1964 10 17 1 .357 .370
1965 11 15 1 .407 .423
1966 14 10 1 .560 .583
1967 13 13 0 .500 .500
1968 9 18 1 .321 .333
1969 14 10 0 .583 .583
1970 13 12 1 .500 .520
1971 15 12 0 .556 .556
1972 15 8 0 .652 .652
1973 11 13 0 .458 .458
1974 11 13 0 .458 .458
1975 8 18 0 .308 .308
1976 4 11 0 .267 .267
1977 11 14 0 .444 .444
1978 10 15 0 .400 .400
1979 10 13 2 .400 .435
1980 5 11 0 .313 .313
1981 13 13 0 .500 .500
1982 10 14 0 .417 .417
1983 11 12 0 .478 .478
1984 13 11 0 .542 .542
1985 13 12 0 .520 .520
1986 13 13 1 .481 .500
1987 12 14 1 .444 .462
1988 19 10 0 .655 .655
1989 12 18 0 .400 .400
1990 8 5 0 .615 .615
1991 15 14 0 .517 .517
1992 15 15 0 .500 .500
1993 15 14 0 .517 .517
1994 21 13 0 .617 .617
1995 17 20 0 .459 .459
1996 16 12 1 .552 .571
1997 11 14 2 .407 .444
1998 19 11 1 .613 .633
1999 15 16 2 .485 .516
2000 14 12 1 .519 .538
2001 18 10 3 .581 .642
2002 12 19 1 .375 .387
2003 16 14 2 .500 .533
2004 13 20 1 .382 .394
2005 17 11 2 .567 .607
2006 16 14 1 .516 .533
2007 12 21 1 .363 .375
2008 20 11 1 .625 .645
2009 18 15 1 .529 .545
2010 14 16 1 .451 .467
2011 17 15 2 .500 .531
2012 9 20 2 .290 .310
2013 15 15 3 .455 .500
2014 14 16 2 .438 .467
2015 19 12 2 .576 .613
2016 8 17 5 .267 .320
2017 15 17 3 .429 .469
2018 10 18 3 .323 .357
2019 13 16 2 .419 .448
TOTAL 769 810 54 .471 .487
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Clip n Save 2020 Spring Roster

Like Steve Cohen I was desperately hoping that 5-year transition period was some kind of joke but it turns out the joke’s on us. Cohen would been the wealthiest owner in the entire game and they screwed that up. How will the Wilpons top that?

Thanks all for the updates on the “bulldog edition” 2020 spring training roster. Here’s a new one with your corrections, additions and changes. Kinda cool that they remember Jeremy Hefner’s previous identity. Max Moroff, a longshot infield non-roster invitee, appears not to have been assigned a number yet, but could slot in at 7 or 33. Just as likely, Tim Tebow will appear in 15 and Moroff can have his assigned 85. (Update: Moroff is in uniform at 33)

By the way our partner site that hosts our number database was down briefly for repairs. We have a few tweaks to make still on the coach personnel which is why I keep forgetting the Mickey Callaway switch. We’ll be up to date soon!

Number Name Notes
0 Marcus Stroman, P was 7
1 Amed Rosario, SS
2 Dom Smith, IB-OF was 22
3 Tomas Nido, C
4 Jed Lowrie, INF
5 vacant Unassigned (David Wright)
6 Jeff McNeil, INF-OF
7 vacant was Marcus Stroman
8 Vacant Unassigned (Gary Carter)
9 Brandon Nimmo, OF
10 Gary DiSarcina, CH 3rd base coach
11 Tony DeFrancesco, CH 1st base coach
12 Eduardo Nunez, INF NRI
13 Luis Guillorme, INF
14 Retired Gil Hodges
15 Vacant
16 Jake Marisnick, OF
17 Vacant unassigned (Keith Hernandez)
18 Ryan Cordell, OF NRI
19 Luis Rojas, MGR
20 Pete Alonso, 1B
21 Matt Adams, 1B NRI
22 Rick Porcello, P was Dom Smith
23 Brian Schneider, CH quality control coach
24 Robinson Cano, 2B
25 Ricky Bones, CH bullpen coach
26 Jarrett Parker, OF NRI
27 Jeurys Familia, P
28 JD Davis, INF-OF
29 Brad Brach, P
30 Michael Conforto, OF
31 Retired Mike Piazza
32 Steven Matz, P
33 Max Moroff, INF NRI
34 Noah Syndergaard, P
35 Jacob Rhame, P
36 Retiring Jerry Koosman
37 Retired Casey Stengel
38 Justin Wilson, P
39 Edwin Diaz, P
40 Wilson Ramos, C
41 Retired Tom Seaver
42 Retired Jackie Robinson
43 Erasmo Ramirez, P NRI
44 Rene Rivera, C NRI
45 Michael Wacha,P
46 Pedro Payano, P NRI
47 Chasen Shreeve, P NRI
48 Jacob deGrom, P
49 Tyler Bashlor, P
50 Jeremy Accordo, CH assistant pitching coach
51 Paul Sewald, P
52 Yoenis Cespedes, OF
53 Jeremy Hefner, CH pitching coach
54 Chili Davis, CH hitting coach
55 Corey Oswalt, P
56 Tom Slater, CH Assistant hitting coach
57 Dave Racianello, CH Bullpen catcher
58 Hensley Muelens, CH Bench coach
59 Steven Gonsalves, P
60 Andres Gimenez, INF NRI
61 Walker Lockett, P
62 Drew Smith, P
63 Thomas Szapucki, P
64 Jordan Humphreys, P
65 Robert Gsellman, P
66 Franklyn Kilome, P
67 Seth Lugo, P
68 Dellin Betances, P
69 Vacant
70 Ali Sanchez, C
71 Nick Rumbelow, P NRI
72 Steven Nogosek, P NRI
73 Daniel Zamora, P
74 David Rodriguez, C NRI
75 Austin Bossart, C NRI
76 Patrick Mazeika, C NRI
77 David Peterson, P NRI
78 Eric Langill, CH Bullpen catcher
79 Adonis Uceta, P NRI
80 Francisco Rios, P NRI
81 Johneshwy Fargas, OF NRI
82 Matt Blackham, P NRI
83 Ryley Gilliam, P NRI
84 Kevin Smith, P NRI
85 Tim Tebow, OF bet he turns up in 15?
86 Jake Hager, INF NRI
87-99 ???
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2020 Vision

Today came word that the Mets inked veteran sluggo Matt Adams to a minor league deal and invited him to spring training. Whether he winds up a 40-homer hitter in Syracuse or Pete Alonso’s caddy will depend I suspect on whatever Chief Brody has up his sleeve still. I wanna think they have some plans to move things around still (Dom Smith and Cesedes for Arenado?) Who knows.

But with the understanding things are still very fluid, let’s take the first crack at a 2020 numerical roster. Note we’re still awaiting assignments for several coaches (Jeremy Hefner, Tony DeFrancesco); unassigned 40-men players (Ali Sanchez); and non-roster invitees (Adams, Matt Blackham, Ryley Gilliam, Pedro Payano, Francisco Rios, Chasen Shreve, Kevin Smith and Adonis Uceta — and probably several more)… also note there are currently two guys assigned No. 60.

Number Name Notes
0 Marcus Stroman, P was 7
1 Amed Rosario, SS
2 Dom Smith, IB-OF was 22
3 Tomas Nido, C
4 Jed Lowrie, INF
5 vacant David Wright
6 Jeff McNeil, INF-OF
7 vacant was Marcus Stroman
8 Vacant Unassigned (Gary Carter)
9 Brandon Nimmo, OF
10 Gary DiSarcina, CH 1st base coach
11 Vacant was Ruben Tejada
12 Vacant was Juan Lagares
13 Luis Guillorme, INF Was Asbrubal Cabrera
14 Retired Gil Hodges
15 Vacant was Carlos Beltran
16 Jake Marisnick, OF
17 Vacant unassigned (Keith Hernandez)
18 vacant was Rajai Davis
19 Luis Rojas, MGR Was Sam Haggarty
20 Pete Alonso, 1B
21 Vacant was Todd Frazier
22 Rick Porcello, P was Dom Smith
23 vacant was Aaron Altherr
24 Robinson Cano, 2B
25 Ricky Bones, CH bullpen coach
26 Vacant was Mickey Callaway
27 Jeurys Familia, P
28 JD Davis, INF-OF
29 Brad Brach, P
30 Michael Conforto, OF
31 Retired Mike Piazza
32 Steven Matz, P
33 vacant was Hector Santiago
34 Noah Syndergaard, P
35 Jacob Rhame, P
36 Retiring Jerry Koosman
37 Retired Casey Stengel
38 Justin Wilson, P
39 Edwin Diaz, P
40 Wilson Ramos, C
41 Retired Tom Seaver
42 Retired Jackie Robinson
43 Vacant was Luis Avilan
44 vacant/Rene Rivera, C? was Rivera (now NRI)
45 Michael Wacha,P was Zack Wheeler
46 vacant was Brooks Pounders
47 vacant was Drew Gagnon
48 Jacob deGrom, P
49 Tyler Bashlor, P
50 vacant was Jim Riggleman, CH
51 Paul Sewald, P
52 Yoenis Cespedes, OF
53 vacant was Glenn Sherlock, CH
54 Chili Davis, CH hitting coach
55 Corey Oswalt, P
56 Tom Slater, CH Assistant hitting coach
57 Dave Racianello, CH Bullpen catcher
58 Hensley Muelens, CH Bench coach
59 Steven Gonsalves, P was Chuck Hernandez, CH
60* Jeremy Accardo, CH assistant pitching coach
60* Andres Gimenez, INF NRI
61 Walker Lockett, P
62 Drew Smith, P
63 Thomas Szapucki, P was Tim Petersen
64 Jordan Humphreys, P was Chris Flexen
65 Robert Gsellman, P
66 Franklyn Kilome, P
67 Seth Lugo, P
68 Dellin Betances, P
69 Vacant
70 Eric Hanhold, P
71 vacant
72 Steven Nogosek, P NRI
73 Daniel Zamora, P
74 vacant Ali Sanchez, C?
75 vacant
76 vacant Patrick Mazeika, C?
77 David Peterson, P
78 Eric Langill, CH Bullpen catcher
79 vacant
80 vacant
81 vacant
82 vacant
83 Stephen Villines, P?
84 vacant Ryder Ryan, P?
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Master of His Domain

If he can get to opening day before being traded to another club, it looks like Dominic Smith will do so with a new number.

Readers and attendees of yesterday’s Fan Fest at Citifield reported seeing baseball’s most popular reserve first baseman sporting No. 2. That’s evidently because newly arrived Rick Porcello took 22 from him, although as relayed by Matt in the comments in the below section:

I wonder why Porcello just didn’t take #21. He switched to it in Detroit and wore it in college. I remember Dom got #22 from former coach Tom Goodwin. Seemed like he would be reluctant to give up his number. Maybe Porcello bought him a nice Rolex.

There’s conflicting “reports” out there about how much tinkering the Mets may still do with this club; it seems that guys like Smith, Yoenis Cespedes, Brandon Nimmo, Jed Lowrie are being thrown about, though if you ask me there better be Nolan Arenado as the end result if they are going cough these guys up.

Smith would be the first No. 2 since Joe Panik departed for Toronto.

Also heard from longtime reader Jason, who patches the following holes in the upcoming roster: Steven Gonsalves 59; Andres Gimenez 60; Tomas Szapucki 63; Jordan Humpheys 64; and Tim David Petersen 77. Also, bench coach Hensley Muelens was spotted wearing 58 (thanks Gene).

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You Say It’s Your Birthday?

As we saw yesterday, hastily but hopefully promoted Luis Rojas officially took over as the team’s 23rd manager. I’m going to “count” Carlos Beltran’s 84-day run–they just happened all to be off-days.

Rojas slipped on the No. 19 jersey–not because his older brother Moises wore 18 and his father Felipe Alou famously wore 17 as a manager–but because of his birthday September 1– 1/9 as they would say in in most places.

Rojas would be first first Mets manager to wear 19, and the first issue of the number since late last year when Sam Haggarty (Sam Who-herty?) appeared, mostly as a pinch runner. Haggerty–who was one of the guys they got from Cleveland in the Kevin Plawecki deal–was dropped from the 40-man roster a few weeks back when Dellin Betances came aboard, and subsequently scooped up by Seattle.

Here’s a newly updated list of Mets Managers By the Number:

Manager Years Number
Casey Stengel 1962-65 37
Wes Westrum 1965-67 9
Salty Parker 1967 54
Gil Hodges 1968-71 14
Yogi Berra 1972-75 8
Roy McMillan 1975 51
Joe Frazier 1976-77 55
Joe Torre 1977-81 9
George Bamberger 1982-83 31
Frank Howard 1983 55
Davey Johnson 1984-1990 5
Bud Harrelson 1990-91 3
Mike Cubbage 1991 4
Jeff Torborg 1992-93 10
Dallas Green 1993-96 46
Bobby Valentine 1996-2002 2
Art Howe 2003-2004 18
Willie Randolph 2005-2008 12
Jerry Manuel 2008-2010 53
Terry Collins 2011-2017 10
Mickey Callaway 2018-2019 36/26*
Carlos Beltran 2020** 15
Luis Rojas 2020 19

*-Switched to 26 upon announcement of Jerry Koosman retirement, 9/24/19

**-Did not appear in a game.

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Coming Up Rojas

Since our last update you must be well aware the Mets were secondary effect victims of the Houston cheating scandal and so beat Carlos Beltran out of town like a bat into a trash can. As you know I wasn’t exactly on board with Beltran to start with, so while it all looks wobbly for the Mets the pivot to Luis Rojas probably isn’t all bad. I could see a small danger in providing a rookie skipper so little time to prepare for his first Spring Training–I tend to believe that smooth springs are a sign, if not the only sign, of good things ahead–and am aware of how poor starts in both his years were among the things that doomed Mickey Callaway’s clubs so count me as cautiously optimistic.

Rojas has good lineage–he’s among 10 children of Felipe Alou (he’s a product of his 3rd of his four wives, making him a half-brother of one-time Met Moises Alou, a nephew of one-time Met Jesus Alou, and a half-cousin of one-time Met Mel Rojas, himself a half-brother to Felipe, Jesus and Matty). “Alou” was Felipe’s mother’s last name and was “assigned” that when his father’s surname Rojas was lost in translation, yet passed along to Luis. Mel took his father’s name as he was born of a different mother than the Alou siblings. Got that?

Now, what number will he wear? Rojas in previous outings with the Mets has worn No. 60 as a guest coach and last year, a “quality control” coach. A look at the developing Mets roster would suggest however that 60 is assigned currently to both Rojas and assistant pitching coach Jeremy Accardo. We’ll figure it all out soon I hope.

Speaking now of the roster, that’s also coming into play… a little. In addition to Rojas coaches Jeremy Hefner, Tony DeFrancesco and Hensely Muelens have yet to be assigned, as have new 40-man arrivals Stephen Gonsalves, Jordan Humpheys, Thomas Szapuki, Ali Sanchez and Andres Gimenez, so I’ll stop short of publishing a full spring roster quite yet.

But I am noting the following new assignments: Jake Marisnick in 16; Rick Porcello in 22, conflicting for the moment with Dom Smith; and Michael Wacha in 45. Hopefully they they figure it all out by Spring Training.

*

Do you collect scorecards? I’m teaming up with a longtime MBTN benefactor to inventory our source materials (for me, all pre-1999 as this site has kept track since then). The collection, inspired in part by the Andy Hassler mystery mentioned below, has already turned up some very interesting new wrinkles which I’ll share with you all soon, one of them about the newest Met Hall of Famer, Jon Matlack. If you have old scorecards and want to help, do me a big solid and shoot the roster page, note the date to the best of your ability and send it in!

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